To Restore Our Soils Feed the Microbes

To Restore Our Soils Feed the Microbes
Aug17

To Restore Our Soils Feed the Microbes

“New research suggests that by fostering an efficient and active soil microbiome, we can accelerate soil regeneration far beyond typical rates seen in nature.”

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Germs at four, less inflammation at forty
Aug11

Germs at four, less inflammation at forty

“Prior research had shown that being exposed to certain types of germs and parasites during early life might, somewhat paradoxically, reduce one’s risk of suffering from allergy later in childhood and adulthood,” Kuzawa says. “Our research in the Philippines extended this work by investigating whether inflammation — another aspect of immune function that has broad health impacts — might also be altered in response to these exposures.”

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How to Plant a Tree in the Desert
Aug11

How to Plant a Tree in the Desert

“So what did Ruys invent? One way to restore degraded soil is to plant trees—lots of them. The catch is that seeds and saplings won’t grow in such soil, but if a young tree becomes large enough that its roots can reach groundwater it stands an excellent chance of thriving.”

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Doomsday narratives about climate change don’t work. But here’s what does
Jul17

Doomsday narratives about climate change don’t work. But here’s what does

This recent opinion piece from The Guardian captures our philosophy about giving people hope so that they are empowered to take Climate Action in their communities.

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Ruminants and methane: Not the fault of the animals
Jul17

Ruminants and methane: Not the fault of the animals

“Cattle and sheep are blamed for contributing to greenhouse gases, belching out methane, and farmers in the future are likely to be taxed because of it.

The recent Green Left Weekly climate change liftout [issue #1078] calls for a drastic reduction in sheep and cattle numbers. There is a TV advertisement, urging people to “go vego to save the planet”. This is a gross misunderstanding of the ruminant carbon cycle.

Ruminants have always emitted methane; it is not something new. Huge herds of wild buffalo, cattle, goats, sheep, deer, cameloids and wildebeest have grazed the grasslands of the world for millions of years. The American prairies once supported greater numbers of bison than they now do cattle, despite the intensive corn and soy production that feeds them.

Methane emissions from wild ruminants was never a problem because nature does not permit waste — the methane was used as food for methanotrophic bacteria in the soil and neutralised. It was never a problem until agricultural practices started destroying these methanotrophic bacteria, which are very sensitive to chemical fertilisers and herbicides. These bacteria reactivate in biologically managed soil.”

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